I would like to apologise to my mother for posting a photo of her “questionable” parking. I hope to make it up to her by presenting her in a better light.
To my beautiful mother, whom I would be nothing without.IMG_20140503_152157

I wanted to investigate the question of “are women worse than met at driving?”. For the stories about women failing to park a smart car in a 2 metre wide space, or the general stereotype that women lack spatial awareness have sparked my interest in the topic.

I have seen arguments on either side of the debate, with statistics backing up either sex (depending on who is reading it). Looking at several articles, I found one which stood out. It had an interesting point that men drive 60% of the time, while women only drive 40%. Perhaps that this is important information, in calculating the percentage of car accidents per time spent on the road. However, the article then followed with, “women probably account for a good 10% of our accidents, too, while nagging from the passenger seat.” I read this sentence a number on times, laughing to myself at the complete bias of the sentence, and just as I was about to move on to a different website, my eye caught a glimpse of the URL, with the website being of the name “askmen.com”. Shocker.

I continued with my research, searching for statistics or comments from neutral parties. I will not bore you with the numbers or facts I found but will quote to you the best argument I found on the matter.

“Women, statistically, have fewer accidents – and they do drive more cautiously, that is true – but I don’t think that defines a better driver. If a skier stays slow, sticks to the easy slopes and just does basic skiing, they’re going to fall a lot less than someone who does ski jumps, goes on the fast slopes, and does tricks – but at the end of the day, who is the better skier?”

From personal experience, I can fully relate to this comment. I have both a brother and a sister, who have been driving for similar amounts of time. From being a passenger in the car on several occasions, I could conclude that men are more prone to risk taking and driving faster, with my sister (the female of the investigation) being somewhat slower and careful. This observation, as I’m sure you could all agree, can be easily criticized as only one person from each gender has been watched, but I do feel that this is the case in our day to day lives.

I am struggling to reach a conclusion on whether women are in fact worse drivers than men.  From looking at it from a global perspective, I would say yes, women are worse drivers. Women do on average get into more road accidents than men, but I believe that other factors, such as age, vision and judgement need to be taken into account, and so on a local scale, opposing arguments may be valid.

Please enjoy the photo of my mother’s parking.

 

 

 

 

 

La Mezquita

Proof that different religions can work together to create beautiful things.

He has risen indeed?

Muck up day has sparked new controversies, but one must admit that the costume is faultless.

All I Wanted Was to Be Rich and Famous

“I’m not young enough to know everything.”
― J.M. Barrie

Funny for Nothing

What is the toughest question you’ve ever been asked?

For me, “Fries – large or medium?” and “Are you out of your mind?” are top contenders. But they aren’t the toughest questions I’ve ever been asked – not by a long shot.

No, the undoubted winner is “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

I like to call this question the ‘How It All Began’ question. I’ll explain.

Imagine this: You’re three years old and your parents have guests over. You’re busy playing with your ‘Barney-the-dinosaur’ soft toy. All of a sudden, there’s a lull in the conversation. Nobody knows what to say, so all eyes slowly turn towards you. You’re too young and innocent to know that you are the next victim. “Aww, what a sweet child,” one lady croons. She looks straight at you and asks, “So, what do you want to be when you…

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To revise or not to revise

Honestly, I have no idea where to start. 

I feel that most people would say “let me start at the beginning”, but there is no way that I will be filling you in on the irrelevant years of my life. For this year is the only year that has ever really mattered. This year is the year in which decisions have been made. For these decisions being made in the next 2 months are those that will stay with me for the rest of my life. These exams direct your entire life: your job, your family – your future. And yet, it is too difficult to stop this mindless procrastination, attempting to numb the pain of revision. Speaking to friends, going outside or even just making toast seems like a far more appealing option.

But what is it that makes revision so unbelievably painful? I will tell you the answer in one simple word.

Repetition.

For the first time a person fully absorbs information or a concept, it is new and refreshing. It may challenge or question fundamental beliefs of the recipient. But once that initial stage is over, the excitement of understanding the information is gone.

And so, I offer encouragement to those that are suffering from this endless repetition and revision. Although you are going to be restless, keep going with your work, for your long term knowledge will be more satisfying than trivial procrastination.

Image“You never want to see kids repeat your own mistakes.” – Thomas Pynchon